Remote Medical International Veteran Employees

Staff Spotlight: Veterans Day Edition

Veterans Day is an important opportunity for everyone to recognize our country’s service members and the invaluable work they do every day. At Remote Medical International, veterans are an important part of our staff and community. Given the often challenging environments in which we must perform, the experience of our veterans makes a difference for our company and our clients. We’ve also found the leadership and team-building skills that veterans bring to our team are valuable, no matter the role or situation.

We work hard to create a culture that is welcoming to those who have served in our armed forces and celebrates their achievements and contributions. As such, leading up to Veterans Day this year, we spoke with three veterans who currently work for Remote Medical International about their journey and why they chose to join our team.

Andy Kimmell

Branch: Army
Rank: Sergeant
Length of Service: 6 Years
MOS: 68W W1 (Special Operations Combat Medic)
Current Position: QHSSE Director

Q: What has been the hardest thing about transitioning from military to civilian life?
A: The military offers a great deal of structure and stability, you always know what’s expected of you. In civilian life, this can often be an unknown, especially when building a new program or implementing a project that’s never been done before. Thankfully, the military also teaches you to be resourceful and adaptive, skills that can help you make this transition successfully.

Q: What is it about Remote Medical International that makes it feel like a welcoming environment for a veteran?
A: I think the biggest thing is that this company recognizes the value that military service and training brings, not just to executing projects in the field, but also to being successful in business. One of the most important things you deal with in the military, especially in special operations, is maintaining order when things are chaotic. This is a critically important skill when working in medicine, especially in some of the more challenging environments where we operate, but it’s also critically important for making hard business decisions.

Q: If you could give any advice to a transitioning service member, what would it be?
A: Listen. Listen, listen, and hear everybody around you first. Learn the team’s rules, play within them, and make the team’s success your success.

Marissa Perez

Branch: Army

Rank: First Lieutenant
Length of Service: 5 years active duty, 2 years reserve
MOS: 91A (Ordnance Officer)
Current Position: Project Coordinator

Q: What has been the hardest thing about transitioning from military to civilian life?
A: I think one of the biggest challenges was that so many civilian employers didn’t understand how my military experience was relevant to them, and they would often see it as a “blank” spot in my resume. The truth is that my time in the military challenged me to become a better leader and manager than almost anything else I could have done. I learned how to put together huge, complex projects, and make sure they succeeded with limited resources and in constantly changing circumstances. I learned how to manage large and diverse teams in difficult situations. I learned how to put my heart and soul into making things work. These are the kinds of skills that can be incredibly valuable assets for any employer.

Q: What is it about Remote Medical International that makes it feel like a welcoming environment for a veteran?
A: In the military, everyone is treated with respect based on the skills and the role they play in making something happen. I’ve found that with many civilian employers this just isn’t the case. Instead you’re expected to play a role, like acting “sweet” because of your gender. Remote Medical International has been a breath of fresh air. From day one, my military service has been seen as an asset and I’m not asked to be something I’m not. I know I can be a bad-ass leader here because I see other women working here that are already doing that.

Q: If you could give any advice to a transitioning service member, what would it be?
A: Your military experience is valuable and relevant. Don’t let anyone tell you that it’s not and absolutely don’t let anyone tell you you’re worth less because of it. You are a trained, experienced, and valuable professional.

Joel Walker

Branch: Navy
Rank: Petty Officer – First Class
Length of Service: 20 years
MOS: Hospital Corpsman
Current Position: Medical Screening Coordinator / Case Manager

Q: What has been the hardest thing about transitioning from military to civilian life?
A: In the military there’s a sense of fraternity you often lack in civilian life. No matter where you went, you were part of this family. You knew you had similar experiences like basic training and specific unit required training, and you knew that every few years you could be working and living someplace new. It’s hard to find that kind of feel in the civilian world. People are often just focused on taking care of their small piece of the puzzle instead of all pulling the same direction and doing whatever it takes to help each other and get the job done. You’ll see small groups of people going out together and doing things instead of the entire team. It can be very challenging to make that transition.

Q: What is it about Remote Medical International that makes it feel like a welcoming environment for a veteran?
A: People here are allowed to work to their strengths, even if it’s outside their specific job function. You don’t feel stuck in a role, there are opportunities to try different things and to grow professionally in a way that leverages your unique experience and abilities. You’re asked to take the 30,000 foot view, not just do your small part, because the job here is to work together to help the company succeed.

Q: If you could give any advice to a transitioning service member, what would it be?
A: Just like in the military, things can change quickly in a civilian job. The job you were hired into is not necessarily the job that you will fit into long term. The military teaches you to be adaptable, and that’s a skill you’re going to want to be ready to apply.

Consider Joining Our Team

If you’re a veteran looking for employment opportunities, or anyone who wants to work in a place that honors our heroes, please check out our open opportunities.

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